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Formative Assessment and Bridging activities

Grade 1


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*These standards are bridging standards. Standards are considered a bridge when they: function as a bridge to which other content within the grade level/course is connected; serve as prerequisite knowledge for content to be addressed in future grade levels/courses; or possess endurance beyond a single unit of instruction within a grade level/course.

Standard 1.1A

Standard 1.1a Count forward orally by ones to 110, starting at any number between 0 and 110. 

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Understanding the Learning Trajectory

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Student Strengths

Orally count to 100 by 1s, starting at any number.


The child will count with understanding and use numbers to tell how many, describe order, and compare.

Bridging Concepts

Counts accurately beyond 100 [to 110], recognizing the patterns of ones, tens, and hundreds 

Standard 1.1A

Count forward orally by ones to 110, starting at any number between 0 and 110 .

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Standard 1.1B

Standard 1.1B Write numerals 0 to 110 in sequence/out-of-sequence.

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Student Strengths

Students can orally count to 100.


Students can write numbers to 20.


Students can identify one more and one less.

Bridging Concepts

Students can Identify patterns in counting and writing number strings.


Student can start counting and writing in the middle of a string of numbers based on given information.

Standard 1.1B

Students can write numerals 0 to 110 in sequence/out-of-sequence. 

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Standard 1.1c

Standard 1.1c  Count backward orally by ones when given any number between 1 and 30.

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Student Strengths

The student will count backward orally by one when given any number between 1 and 10


The student will count forward by ones from 0 to 100

Bridging Concepts

Students can identify the number before, without counting, when given any number between 1 and 30.


Students can count backward orally by ones when given any number between 1 and 20.


Students can count backward by ones when given the exact number of manipulatives to remove as he or she counts. 

Standard 1.1c

Students can count backward orally by ones when given any number between 1 and 30.

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Standard 1.1d

Standard 1.1D Count forward orally by ones, twos, fives, and tens to determine the total number of objects to 110.

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Student Strengths

Students can count forward to 100 by 1s.


Students can skip count by 10s to 100.


Students can recognize benchmark numbers like 5, 10 and use tools like fingers, ten frames and hundreds chart to count orally.


Bridging Concepts

Students can skip count by 5s, connecting to 10s pattern.


Students can skip count by 2.



Standard 1.1D

Students can count forward orally by ones, twos, fives, and tens to determine the total number of objects to 110 .

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Standard 1.2a

Standard 1.2A Group a collection into tens/ones and write the corresponding numeral.

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Student Strengths

Students can tell how many are in a set of 20 or fewer by counting orally.


Students read, write, and represent numbers 0-20.


Students can count forward orally by ones 0 to 100.


Students can count forward orally by tens, starting at 0, to determine a total number of objects to 100.

Bridging Concepts

Students can make a group of ten that represents one set of ten.


Students can write the corresponding numeral for collections of tens.


Students can identify the place and value for each digit in a two digit number.


Students can identify the number of tens and ones that can be made from any number up to 100.

Standard 1.2A

Students can group a collection into tens and ones and write the corresponding numeral.

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Standard 1.2B

Standard 1.2B Compare two numbers between 0 and 110 represented pictorially or with concrete objects, using the words greater than, less than or equal to.

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Student Strengths

Students can compare and describe a set as having more, fewer, or the same number of objects as another set.

Bridging Concepts

Students can represent two digit numbers pictorially.


Students can count and represent numbers from 100-110.


Students can correctly use the words greater than, less than, and equal to.

Standard 1.2B

Students can compare two numbers between 0 and 110 represented pictorially or with concrete objects, using the words greater than, less than or equal to. 

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Standard 1.2c

Standard 1.2C Order three or fewer sets from least to greatest and greatest to least.

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Student Strengths

Students can compare and order three or fewer sets, each set containing 10 or fewer concrete objects, from least to greatest and greatest to least.

Bridging Concepts

Students can compare sets up to 110 objects.


Students can understand and use the terms least to greatest and greatest to least.

Standard 1.2C

Students can order three or fewer sets from least to greatest and greatest to least.

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Standard 1.3

Standard 1.3 When given an ordered set of ten objects and/or pictures, indicate the ordinal position of each object, first through tenth.

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Student Strengths

Students can count a set of objects and/or pictures 0-10


Students can label two-step directions or two-item sets as first and next. 

Bridging Concepts

Students can determine where a set starts or the sequence of objects. 


Students can orally match the ordinal terms (first, second, third, fourth, etc) to the cardinal counterpart. 


Students understand and can use the vocabulary words left, right, top, and bottom. 

Standard 1.3

Students can indicate the ordinal position of each object, first through tenth, in an ordered set of ten objects and/or pictures.

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Standard 1.4ab

Standard 1.6 The student will,

a) Represent and solve practical problems involving equal sharing with two or four sharers; and

b) Represent and name fractions for halves and fourths, using models.

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Student Strengths

The student will investigate fractions by representing and solving practical problems involving equal sharing with two sharers. 

Bridging Concepts

Students can use and understand the vocabulary for halves and fourths. 


Students can utilize equipartitioning with halves on a model (See LT website as Shape Equipartitioner)

Standard 1.4ab

Students can -represent and solve practical problems involving equal sharing with two or four sharers; and-represent and name fractions for halves and fourths, using models.

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Standard 1.5ab

Standard 1.5 The student will

a) Select a reasonable order of magnitude from three given quantities: a one-digit numeral, a two-digit numeral, and a three-digit numeral (e.g., 5, 50, 500); and

b) Explain the reasonableness of the choice.

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Student Strengths

Students understand and use conservation of number when counting up to 100. 


Students understand and use conservation of area when counting. 


Students can compare and describe one set as having more, fewer, or the same number of objects as the other set(s).

Bridging Concepts

Students have experiences with sets of objects ranging from 1 digit quantities to 3 digit quantities. 


Students can estimate the number of objects in a set based upon appearance such as clustering, grouping, and comparing. 

Standard 1.5ab

Students can select a reasonable order of magnitude from three given quantities: a one-digit numeral, a two-digit numeral, and a three-digit numeral (e.g., 5, 50, 500); and explain the reasonableness of the choice.

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Standard 1.6

Standard 1.6 Create and solve single-step story and picture problems using addition and subtraction within 20.

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Student Strengths

Students can represent addition and subtraction story problems within 10.


Students can recognize, describe, and utilize part/whole relationships through 10 to solve single-step problems.


Students can count to 20 and beyond.

Bridging Concepts

Students can recognize, describe, and utilize part/whole relationships through 20.


Students can use strategies like counting on from a larger number.


Students can select, utilize, and explain strategies to solve various types of problems. 

Standard 1.6

Students can create and solve single-step story and picture problems using addition and subtraction within 20. 

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Standard 1.7a

Standard 1.7a Recognize and describe with fluency part-whole relationships for numbers to 10.

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Student Strengths

Students can recognize and describe part-whole relationships to 5. 

Students easily recognize (subitize) sets up to 5.

Bridging Concepts

Students can recognize partners (complements) of 10, and patterns within partners of 10.

Standard 1.7a

Students can recognize and describe with fluency part-whole relationships for numbers to 10. 

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Standard 1.7b

Standard 1.7B Demonstrate fluency with addition and subtraction within 10.

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Student Strengths

Represent addition and subtraction story problems within 10.


Recognize, describe, and utilize part/whole relationships through 10 to solve single-step problems.


Count to 20 and beyond.

Bridging Concepts

Recognize, describe, and utilize part/whole relationships through 20.


Select, utilize, and explain strategies to solve various types of problems. 

Standard 1.7b

Demonstrate fluency with addition and subtraction within 10.

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Standard 1.8

Standard 1.8 Determine the value of a collection of like coins (pennies, nickels, or dimes) whose total value is 100 cents or less.

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Student Strengths

The student will recognize the attributes of a penny, nickel, dime, and quarter and identify the number of pennies equivalent to a nickel, a dime, and a quarter. 

Bridging Concepts

The student will skip count by fives and tens up to 100.  


The student will understand that the value of a coin is not related to its size. 

Standard 1.8

Students can determine the value of a collection of like coins (pennies, nickels, or dimes) whose total value is 100 cents or less.

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Standard 1.9a

Standard 1.9a Tell time to hour and half-hour, using analog and digital clocks.

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Student Strengths

Students can recognize the numbers 1-12.

Bridging Concepts

Students can recognize the number 30.


Students recognize the role of each of the hands on an analog clock.


Students understand that half an hour means one of two parts has passed.

Standard 1.9a

Students can tell time to hour and half-hour, using analog and digital clocks.

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Standard 1.9b

Standard 1.9b Read and interpret a calendar.

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Student Strengths

Students can investigate the passage of time by reading and interpreting a calendar. 

Bridging Concepts

Students can name the date of a specific day in time. 


Students can identify a specific date in time on a calendar. 

Standard 1.9b

Students can read and interpret a calendar.
  • Read a calendar to locate a given day or date (e.g., What day of the week is the 10th? What date is Saturday?). 
  • Determine the day/date before and after a given day/date (e.g., Today is the 30th, so yesterday must have been the __?).
  • Given a calendar, determine the number of any day of the week (e.g., How many Fridays are in the month of October?)

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Standard 1.10

Standard 1.10  Use nonstandard units to measure and compare length, weight, and volume.

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Student Strengths

The student will compare two objects as longer/shorter, heavier/lighter, and more/less.

Bridging Concepts

Students can use the same nonstandard unit to measure two objects.


Students measure by repeating (iterating) a single unit and understands the need for equal-length unit (See LT website Unit relater and iterator)


Students can match a nonstandard unit to length, weight, and volume. 

Standard 1.10

Students can use nonstandard units to measure and compare length, weight, and volume.

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Standard 1.11ab

Standard 1.11ab The student will

a) identify, trace, describe, and sort plane figures (triangles, squares, rectangles, and circles) according to number of sides, vertices, and angles; and

b) identify and describe representations of circles, squares, rectangles, and triangles in different environments, regardless of orientation, and explain reasoning.

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Student Strengths

The student can


Bridging Concepts

Students can identify plane figures based upon a description of characteristics rather than an image of the figure. 


Students understand specific characteristics of plane figures such as squares and rectangles have special angles called right angles and circles are curved.